Pioneers and nationally recognized leaders in estate planning.

650.493.8070 local

800.244.9424 toll-free

Nursing shortage leaves families struggling to find at-home care

Families across California approved for at-home nursing care are having difficulty getting the help they desperately need. Health care advocates are pointing to a larger nationwide nursing shortage as one of the reasons demands are not being met.

The American Association of Nurses has noted a lack of younger nurses to replace older nurses who are retiring. A licensed vocational nurse (LVN) is among the most sought-after home care nurses. Licensed vocation nurses are responsible for providing basic nursing care under the guidance of a doctor or registered nurse.

The at-home nursing shortage is attributed in part to low Medi-Cal reimbursement rates which make it challenging to hire nurses with the desired skills. Nurses say they are already dealing with low pay and poor working conditions — problems that are only exacerbated by the nationwide nursing shortage. According to an ABC 10 News report, health care providers are struggling to recruit and retain nurses willing to work for considerably less than potential earnings in the private sector.

Assembly member Brian Maienschein proposed legislation that would partly raise Medi-Cal reimbursement rates. He said the bill would improve care and quality of life for children.

“It’s important to note that any change to Medi-Cal reimbursement rates, including Home Health Agency (HHA) services, are a part of the state budget process and must also receive approval from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services,” a California Department of Health Care Services spokesperson said in a statement.

The department said it is developing a process to help families find nurses to fulfill the hours authorized for HHA services. They said a number of factors must be considered such as payment levels for HHA services as well as the geographic availability of care providers.