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Hugh Hefner’s will forbids heirs from using drugs and alcohol

Hugh Hefner was vocal about his dislike of drugs and alcohol, as well as his concerns about substance abuse. It appears that the Playboy founder, who died in September 2017 at age 91, drafted his will to reflect those views.

Hefner’s trust includes a clause that blocks his heirs from accessing their inheritance if they are found to have engaged in substance abuse. It says that if any of his four children or his widow become “physically or psychologically” dependent on drugs or alcohol, they will not be able to obtain any money. The rule also applies to clinical dependence on alcohol consumption or use of chemical substances that are not prescribed by a psychiatrist or doctor.

According to the will, the inheritance’s trustees will be responsible for determining whether the heirs have violated Hefner’s terms. The trustees can ask them to submit to drug testing at any time if substance abuse is suspected. Payments may restart once the individual in question has remained sober for 12 months or is “able to care for himself or herself again.”

Placing restrictions on an inheritance is not uncommon. Individuals may choose to include drug and alcohol testing requirements out of concern for a beneficiary’s wellbeing, especially if they have an addiction problem. Such clauses are usually intended to protect beneficiaries and ensure the inheritance is distributed according to one’s wishes.

Robot caregivers elicit mix of worry and enthusiasm among Americans

A Pew Research Center survey conducted last year offers some interesting insights into how people feel about robot caregivers and automation in general. Some Americans view robots as a possible solution to the anticipated shortage in caregivers for the nation’s aging population. However, many are concerned about the negative consequences of replacing human caregivers with technology.

One of the earliest caregiving robots ever created was PARO, a therapy robot in the form of a cuddly baby seal that helps patients who suffer from memory loss. Currently, researchers in Oklahoma State University and other institutions are developing robots that can not only serve as companions, but also perform household tasks, assess vital signs, lift people, seek assistance in emergencies and dispense medication.

Around 40 percent of survey respondents expressed interest in the idea of having a robot caregiver. They believe that such technology would help young people worry less about caring for elderly family members. In addition, robot caregivers would allow older adults more independence and enable them to remain in their own homes longer.

Among those interested in using robot caregivers, just over 20 percent feel they would provide better, more reliable care than paid human caregivers today. For example, a robot would not get tired nor let emotions or biases affect the quality of care provided. In addition, they can help ease the burden on family members who are often juggling other responsibilities.

Conversely, nearly 60 percent of adults said they would not want robot caregivers for themselves or loved ones. The main reason for this appeared to be a lack of trust and compassion. While some people believe that the human touch can never be replicated by technology, others are worried about robots making mistakes in caring for their family members. Some survey respondents liked the idea of having a human remotely monitor the robot, such as via video surveillance.

Attorney Michael Gilfix featured as Great Giver in PACE newsletter

Attorney Michael Gilfix was recently recognized for his generous support of the nonprofit Pacific Autism Center for Education (PACE). He was featured as a “Great Giver” in the Spring 2018 issue of the PACE Setter newsletter in acknowledgement of his positive impact on the community.

Gilfix is a nationally known authority in the fields of elder law, estate planning and special needs trusts. He is a founding partner of Gilfix & La Poll Associates. The Palo Alto-based law firm has been a pioneering force in its commitment to advocating for elders, individuals with special needs and others who lack representation.

Gilfix & La Poll and PACE have once again partnered for the annual Special Needs Trust seminar to provide helpful information to families of children with special needs. This year’s seminar was held on May 2 in Palo Alto.

Read the PACE feature article here