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Autism costs rise dramatically with age: study

Caring for individuals with autism and other special needs tends to involve a lifetime of expenses, whether it is paying for caregivers, accommodation or daily necessities. A study from the University of California, Davis (UCD), shows California spends significantly more on adults with autism compared to children who have the disorder. Researchers found state expenditures soar as people with autism age.

Each individual under the age of 18 received an average of $10,500 in state funding annually. Meanwhile, costs for adults were two and a half times higher at around $26,500. The widest gap was between the youngest and oldest age groups with an average difference of nearly $38,000.

The UC Davis Health System study examined per-person spending on autism services for over 42,000 California residents with autism. Researchers analyzed the California Department of Developmental Services’ spending from 2012 to 2013. The department funds services for people with autism through 21 regional centers in California.

The data took into account costs for transportation, daycare, employment support and accommodation at community care facilities. It did not include medical expenses or school expenditure. The study found daycare and residential care were the sources of the highest costs.

“As children with autism grow up and become adults and no longer receive public school-based assistance, their services transition to expensive independent living support and more of the cost burden shifts to the state,” said study author Paul Leigh, a public health sciences professor at UCD. “We hope our data can help justify earlier, expanded and equitable spending on younger children with autism. There is a great return on investment in high-quality early intervention services.”